Lost, Season 6, Episode 17 and 18: The End

By June 1st, 2010 5 Comments

Wow, what a deeply WEIRD show.

I was going to start off here with a gag about that Chekov line where if you have a loaded gun in the first act you have to have it go off in the third, and I was going to say something about how Lost has a small arsenal of unused weapons. I was also going to talk about how much I love Kill Bill (the two volumes as one movie), and how I wanted one ending (BIG FIGHT SCENE), and got something totally different (The Bride and Bill did not even get out of their chairs) — and was totally satisfied. I want to see plots reach their natural conclusion, but I can also be convinced to care about something else. I feel like Walt, and Aaron, and Dharma, and time travel, should mean something — I don’t want to feel like Jin time travelled and Sun did not for no reason other than the writers thought it would be more dramatic to keep them apart. (Don’t tell me Jacob did not time travel her because she is a mother: so was Kate and he offered her the job.)

I have no idea what I think about the end of Lost. It is going to take me a while to think it through. I at least three-quarters liked the episode. The whole series is going to take me longer to figure out. But I gotta write so here I go.

The summary. Jack and Locke get Desmond and send him down into the light, where they bet on what the result will be. They end up being both right: Jack is right that when he guesses disturbing the source it will allow him to kill the Man in Black, but the Man in Black is right that it will destroy the island — except it turns out it can be reversed. Jack and the Man in Black fight and both mortally wound each other. Hurley becomes the man in charge of the island with Ben as his second in command — and their first order of business is to get Desmond back. Kate and Sawyer make it to the plane in time to join Richard, Miles, and Lapidus as they leave. In the alt universe everyone remembers and in the big twist of the night the “Alt U” turns out to be a kind of pre-heaven. In the end they are all ready to let go and move onto whatever the afterlife has to offer.

Obviously we are not supposed to care about a lot of the mysteries. I can live with it a bit. That we are not supposed to care what happens to Jin and Sun’s kid is more troubling. That feels like it is going to continue to bug me for a long time to come. My friend Brady points out that the baby is not a character and thus I should be fine with not returning to her, but I am not convinced. Nothing to do with mystery being better as mystery: you can’t introduce a abandoned baby three episodes from the end and just leave it there. Or maybe you can. I don’t know.

Random thing: The writers got to do one of the worst cliches and get away with it — the clip show. As everyone remembers the history on the island, the writers get to show scenes from earlier episodes. Pretty clever.

Random awesome: The go-to-comerical where Jack was doing this jumping punch at John Locke on the cliff. Totally comic book-y in the best way.

Also, there was a kind of funny joke where Juliet tells Sawyer that he has to unplug the candy machine and plug it in again to get it to work. This is basically what Desmond and Jack do — to get rid of the Man in Black they power cycle the island, unplugging the source and plugging it back in. At least the writers were aware of the ridiculousness of what they were doing. I was not so sure they were in on the joke when Kate was “woken up” by basically looking into Claire’s vagina. (Sorry, Mom.) (My mom reads these.) But I can live with it.

Just as Jack has to let go of all kinds of things in order to move on to the afterlife we have to let go of mysteries etc as we say goodbye to the show. And so the Alt U turned out to be this kind of pre-heaven, sort of like a world of Sixth Sense Bruce Willises realizing that they are all ghosts. I don’t know what I think about this. One the one hand I totally see how it made a strong point about how characters matter more than anything else. In the Alt U there were no mysteries — it was just about the way people were connected. And this was the lesson we were to take away from Lost as a whole. Forget the mysteries; character is the only thing that matters. My friend Brady wants to full credit for feeling that the Alt U is especially awesome because it could take place thousands of years in the future after Hurley and Ben were in charge of the island for a LONG time. And I agree that is a pretty good point.

And it was cute how a long running theory of the show — that they all died in the plane crash and that the island was hell or purgatory — was sort of incorporated in a weird way — they DID turn out to be all dead: in the Alt U.

And I enjoyed the BIG irony of season 6. Usually on these kind of stories it turns out that all the weirdness (the island, the light, the smoke monster) was a metaphor — a weird way of talking about something like moving on to the afterlife, which cannot be put into words. But here it turned out that all the weirdness actually happened — it was normal life that was the metaphor. Because, again, it is character that matters, not the mysteries. The island and Jacob and the Man in Black were basically the biggest MacGuffins in history (I think it was my friend Lucas who called the island a MacGuffin a while back).

Character matters is a great point, but it feels like a screenwriter’s point, which is slightly less than it should be. Like the writer’s room lecturing — “lecturing” is far too strong a word — the audience or even other screenwriters about what maters. The Alt U felt less than entirely natural. It was a version of the afterlife that seemed designed to make a point. It was a device to tell us that that other devices the writers used — such as time travel — were not the point. Something does not quite work there. It is not terrible, and I enjoyed the hell out of a lot of the episode, but it feels like in the final analysis less than it should be. I mean I was really moved by a lot of the emotional beats in the Alt U, but they turned out to be kind of … a device. The Alt U was not at all a necessary or natural outgrowth of the main story. But then nothing in Lost turned out to be really connected naturally to anything else. It was a fun ride, but it was a fun ride of unconnected material made up as they went along. That is maybe not the very best kind of fun, but it was pretty fun.

Brady is still trying to tell me leaving an abandoned baby plot is fine because the writers are making a point about how character matters — and the baby was not really a character. But if this is even the right way to look at it, it still feels like a device to make an intellectual point about character, which again, is less than it should be. ‘Cause there is an emotional thing that is being ignored there.

(There is another long post coming about Battlestar Galactica and Lost, and how they handle religious stuff, and character-driven stuff — ’cause the final episode of BSG also tried to simultaneously turn the focus on character and end with big religious stuff. I feel like BSG was way worse in part because it was a lot more serious than Lost but I also feel like this is a totally personal reaction and I would probably not have any way to argue with someone who wanted to say it was just as bad.)

And of course I have to end by saying that I am one good night’s sleep and a few conversations away from a totally different feeling about it.

Thanks to Smartpop for having me. It’s been fun. Follow me from now on at geoffklock.blogspot.com.

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5 Comments On "Lost, Season 6, Episode 17 and 18: The End"

  1. Andrew Zimmerman Jones

    The lack of explanation of the abandoned baby bothered me less than the numerous other mysteries – What’s up with Walt? What’s up with the pregnancy-on-the-island issue? (It can heal cancer & paralysis, but doesn’t have enough life-energy juice to carry a pregnancy to term successfully???) How did Benjamin get Locke’s father onto the island (and was that really Locke’s father)?

    One thing in your post that I’m not clear about: Why would the Sun/Jin time travel issue need explanation? Jin was blasted into the ocean, so he was near the island when it time traveled and went with it. Sun was flying away with the rest of the Oceanic 6. There’s no explanation needed as to why Jacob did this, because Jacob wasn’t responsible for it … at least no more than he was responsible for time-traveling Miles but not time-traveling Desmond. The “physics” of the situation dictated who was time-traveled.

    Finally, I wonder if there is any plan to have an “extended universe” storyline related to Lost, in either novel or comic form. Though everyone being dead seems like it would leave no room for sequels, there’s actually a lot of potential. Hurley is running the island. We know that Jacob could leave the island, so Hurley can too (and Benjamin points out that Hurley can send other people off the island, too … which means the desperate race to the airplane was utterly unnecessary). I could well imagine stories in which Hurley, in order to somehow protect the island, needs to elicit help from other remaining characters: Sawyer, Kate, Desmond, Miles, Walt, Claire, and maybe even a grown-up Aaron (or Sun/Jin’s baby) someday. It would be interesting to see.

    Reply

  2. Alanna

    The one mystery left unanswered that bothered me the most was the mystery of Walt. The “Others” when they took Walt, hinted at him having special abilities. This was consistently hinted at but never revealed or explained. Worse yet, there was a deleted scene or extended scene, I cannot remember which, where the “Others” are discussing having problems keeping Walt under control, he is being kept in the mysterious room 23 and we hear all sorts of ruckus coming from the room. Then, few seasons later, we finally see what’s in room 23, where Whitmore puts Jin after kidnapping him. And then we get the wtf moment of the weird video real that lights up the whole room. What happened to Walt in that room? What was Walt doing when he was with the “Others”? This was the only mystery I wondered about nonstop and thought that showing us room 23 in the last season without any elaboration was just a tease.

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  3. Emily

    The one mystery left unanswered that bothered me the most was the mystery of Walt. The “Others” when they took Walt, hinted at him having special abilities. This was consistently hinted at but never revealed or explained. Worse yet, there was a deleted scene or extended scene, I cannot remember which, where the “Others” are discussing having problems keeping Walt under control, he is being kept in the mysterious room 23 and we hear all sorts of ruckus coming from the room. Then, few seasons later, we finally see what’s in room 23, where Whitmore puts Jin after kidnapping him. And then we get the wtf moment of the weird video real that lights up the whole room. What happened to Walt in that room? What was Walt doing when he was with the “Others”? This was the only mystery I wondered about nonstop and thought that showing us room 23 in the last season without any elaboration was just a tease.

    Reply

  4. Chris

    “Character matters is a great point, but it feels like a screenwriter’s point, which is slightly less than it should be. Like the writer’s room lecturing – “lecturing” is far too strong a word – the audience or even other screenwriters about what maters. The Alt U felt less than entirely natural. It was a version of the afterlife that seemed designed to make a point. It was a device to tell us that that other devices the writers used – such as time travel – were not the point. Something does not quite work there.”

    THIS. The writers definitely seemed to be going for meta, but meta is supposed to add to the story, not detract from it. And it isn’t as if “good writing is all about character” is a particularly new or impressive sentiment. It certainly doesn’t excuse that none of the mysteries were solved. “Veronica Mars” was a great character-driven show too, but that doesn’t mean we didn’t care who killed Lilly Kane.

    In addition, many of the characters I cared about didn’t get satisfactory endings precisely because the mysteries were so directly tied into their characters. Walt, Michael, and Libby spring to mind, but also Jack’s son. Claire and Sayid both got some kind of resolution, but there was a lot about them that was never explained. And I wholeheartedly reject the notion that because Jin and Sun’s daughter wasn’t a “real” character, she doesn’t matter; she certainly matters to Jin and Sun, or at least she should have. A lack of resolution for her is a lack of resolution for Jin and Sun.

    I still love this show dearly, and always will, but I thought this was a very half-assed ending. It was emotionally effective at times, but looking back on it it seems more manipulative than genuinely powerful.

    Reply

  5. Lost_Blu_Ray

    Did you hear? Lost Season 6 is out on Blu-Ray! Already!
    Lost Blu Ray

    Reply

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